US History B/Trial Examination/Alger Hiss

 

1) Trial of Alger Hiss

 

  1. 11.9 Students analyze U.S. foreign policy since World War II. Trace the origins and geopolitical consequences (foreign and domestic) of the Cold - War and containment policy, including the following:

 

Use the internet for your research.

Write an explanation of the trial documents that you find online. Each paragraph you write must have at least 6 sentences. Underline your facts. Follow the outline below. Copy the questions.

 

a) What was the trial about? (Complete explanation, at least 2 paragraphs)

b) What evidence (for and against) was presented in the trial? (At least 3 paragraphs, presenting evidence clearly)

c) What is your opinion of the evidence? Why? (Give reasons: 1-2 paragraphs)

d) What position and comments did the judge take during the trial? (Give quotes). Was the judge objective (fair) or not? Why? (2 paragraphs)

e) What verdict was reached? Why was this verdict reached? What was the verdict based on? (2 paragraphs)

f) Was this verdict just or unjust? Why or why not? (1 paragraph)

g) Looking back at this trial from our view point, would the same verdict be reached today? Why or why not? (1 paragraph)

h) What lesson does this trial have for us today? (1 paragraph)

i) What impact on civil rights did this ruling have? (1 paragraph)

j) Include bibliography: use at least 3 web sites. Do not plagiarize. Use bibliography format below (ask teacher).

 

 

Bibliography format

 

FOR A BOOK: 

 

Authorís last name, first name. Title of book. Place of publication: Publisher, copyright year.

 

example:

Fogle, Bruce. Training Your Dog. New York: DK Publishing, 2001.

If you only used part of a book:

Fogle, Bruce. Training Your Dog. New York: DK Publishing, 2001, pp. 50-55.

 

FOR AN INTERNET ADDRESS:

 

Authorís last name, first name. "Title of item." [Online] Available 

http://address/filename, date of document or download.

 

example:

DiStefano, Vince. "Guidelines for Better Writing." [Online] Available
     http://www.usa.net/~vinced/home/better-writing.html, October 5, 2004.

 

FOR CLASS NOTES: 

Name of person giving lecture (last name first). Kind of class. Location. Kind of notes. Date of lecture.

 

example:

 

Nemetz, M.World History Class. Pueblo High School. Cornell notes. May 29, 2016.